COURSE OUTLINE: BS1016

Course Title

Physiology

Course Code

BS1016

Offered Study Year 1, Semester 1
Course Coordinator Lin Chun Ling, Valerie (Assoc Prof) CLLin@ntu.edu.sg 6316 2843
Pre-requisites None
AU 3
Contact hours Lectures: 26, Tutorials: 10, Laboratories: 3
Approved for delivery from AY 2022/23 semester 1
Last revised 3 Aug 2022, 15:30

Course Aims

This course aims to provide an integrated understanding of how the human body works at the level of body systems, organs, cells and molecules. The content includes the concepts and skills required for understanding the common issues in health and diseases at the individual and community levels. You will gain a broad understanding of recent advances in physiology, and will recognize the value of research at the level of the whole organism. The course will prepare you for subsequent courses and careers that require an understanding of physiology, and will develop your critical thinking and communication skills

Intended Learning Outcomes

Upon successfully completing this course, you should be able to:

  1. Discuss controversial issues such as contraception, use of recombinant protein for milk production and use of performance enhancing drugs
  2. Analyse and exploit scientific research at the whole organism level
  3. Communicate physiological concepts to your peers
  4. Solve problems involving physiology
  5. Perform team work effectively and successfully.
  6. Apply principles of physiology to practical issues in health and disease.
  7. Apply molecular research to the understanding and treatment of diseases

Course Content

The concept and regulation of homeostasis.

The effect and mechanisms of hormone action.

The consequence of hyposecretion and hypersecretion of endocrine gland.

The process and key determinants of sexual differentiation.

The essential roles of hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis in the development and function of the reproductive system.

The importance of tissue compliance and pulmonary surfactant in lung function and mechanics of respiration.

How respiration is regulated in response to changes in arterial O2, CO2 and hydrogen ion.

The vital roles of haemoglobin in O2 reserve and O2 transport in the blood.

The initiation and conduction of electrical signals that lead to coordinated contraction of cardiac atria and ventricles.

How blood flow, pressure, and cardiac output are regulated.

The specific functions of various digestive organs and how they are regulated by the endocrine and neural system.

The critical involvement of the pancreas and the liver in lipid digestion and absorption.

How renal system function to maintain homeostasis of volume, pressure, pH and electrolytes .

How renal processes are regulated by juxtaglomerular apparatus, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and sympathetic activity.

Coordinated regulation of body function by different systems under stressful situation to achieve best performance outcomes.

The physiological basis of common health issues such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes and renal failure.

Assessment

Component Course ILOs tested SBS Graduate Attributes tested Weighting Team / Individual Assessment Rubrics
Continuous Assessment
Tutorials
Participation and quiz 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 1. b, c, d
3. c
5. c
10 individual See Appendix for rubric
Mid-semester Quiz
Multiple Choice Questions 4, 6, 7 1. b, c, d
3. b, c
5. c, d
7. a
30 individual
Examination (2 hours)
Structured Questions & Multiple Choice Questions 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 1. b, c, d
2. a
3. c, f
5. c, d
7. a
60 individual See Appendix for rubric
Total 100%

These are the relevant SBS Graduate Attributes.

1. Recognize the relationship and complexity between structure and function of all forms of life, resulting from an academically rigorous in-depth understanding of biological concepts

b. Explain the relationship between structure and function of all forms of life at the molecular level

c. Explain the relationship between structure and function of all forms of life at the cellular level

d. Explain the relationship between structure and function of all forms of life at the organism level

2. Critically evaluate and analyze biological information by applying the knowledge, scientific methods and technical skills associated with the discipline

a. Identify the assumptions behind scientific problems and issues

3. Develop and communicate biological ideas and concepts relevant in everyday life for the benefit of society

b. Display and explain scientific results clearly and persuasively to peers both verbally and in writing (includes the ability to graph data appropriately and accurately).

c. Demonstrate an understanding of the recursive nature of science, where new results continually modify previous knowledge

f. Demonstrate an understanding of the social and natural context of knowledge (role of science in society, influence of society on science)

5. Develop communication, creative and critical thinking skills for life-long learning

c. Demonstrate critical thinking skills such as analysis, discrimination, logical reasoning, prediction and transforming knowledge

d. Question the assumptions, sources, and contexts of scientific investigation

7. Demonstrate information literacy and technological fluency

a. Locate and evaluate information needed to make decisions, solve problems, design experiments, and understand scientific data

Formative Feedback

The students will be provided with feedback throughout the course.

Scheduled Consultation Hours
There are scheduled consultation hours in the weeks leading to mid-term and final exam for you to meet the course coordinator and clarify doubts and concepts. The course coordinator will also provide feedback on your understanding and offer advice if you have difficulties.

Class Participation and Quiz
The tutorial classes are conducted in an interactive mood using interactive platforms Wooclap and Padlet. Tutorial questions will include multiple choice questions and open-ended questions. The open-ended nature of some of the questions challenge students’ thinking and help students to develop critical thinking and analytical skills. The class will provide opportunities for teamwork. Students are encouraged to engage discussions with their peers during the allocated time. Students’ understanding and participation will be assessed through multiple choice questions and polling during the tutorial.

Mid-term test
After the test, you will be provided with answers and rationale for the answers. You will also receive your grade and encouraged to talk to the course coordinator if you need further clarification.

Final exam
After the release of the final exam results, the course coordinator will provide an exam report to briefly discuss students’ performance in the paper in general and common mistakes.

Learning and Teaching Approach

Lectures
(26 hours)

We will use ResponseWare to prmote active learning during class. The teaching team includes NTU professors as well as a clinician guest speaker.

The history of major discoveries including Nobel prize-winning work, interesting physiology anecdotes and some classical experiments in physiology are highlighted to raise students’ interests in physiological research as well as the history of the science.

Tutorials
(10 hours)

The tutorial classes are conducted in an interactive mood using interactive platforms Wooclap and Padlet. Tutorial questions will include multiple choice questions and open-ended questions. The open-ended nature of some of the questions challenge students’ thinking and help students to develop critical thinking and analytical skills. The class will provide opportunities for teamwork. Students are encouraged to engage discussions with their peers during the allocated time. Students’ understanding and participation will be assessed through multiple choice questions and polling during the tutorial.

Laboratories
(3 hours)

You will conduct a computer simulation of cardiovascular processes to enhance your understanding of the regulation of cardiovascular function.

Reading and References

Main text book
Sherwood’s Human Physiology, 9th Edition by Lauralee Sherwood,ISBN-13: 978-1285866932

Main Reference book
Vander’s Human Physiology 14th Edition, Mc Graw Hill Education, ISBN13: 9781259820755

Course Policies and Student Responsibilities

You are strongly encouraged to attend all lectures and learn in a large group setting. Most lectures will have clicker questions to stimulate your thinking and improve your understanding. You are expected to actively participate in these activities and class discussion. Tutorial attendance and participation are essential to achieve the learning outcomes. It is therefore compulsory to attend a minimum of 80% of the tutorials. It is also compulsory to attend the computer Lab session and complete all assigned activities.

Academic Integrity

Good academic work depends on honesty and ethical behaviour. The quality of your work as a student relies on adhering to the principles of academic integrity and to the NTU Honour Code, a set of values shared by the whole university community. Truth, Trust and Justice are at the core of NTU’s shared values.

As a student, it is important that you recognize your responsibilities in understanding and applying the principles of academic integrity in all the work you do at NTU. Not knowing what is involved in maintaining academic integrity does not excuse academic dishonesty. You need to actively equip yourself with strategies to avoid all forms of academic dishonesty, including plagiarism, academic fraud, collusion and cheating. If you are uncertain of the definitions of any of these terms, you should go to the Academic Integrity website for more information. Consult your instructor(s) if you need any clarification about the requirements of academic integrity in the course.

Course Instructors

Instructor Office Location Phone Email
Lin Chun Ling, Valerie (Assoc Prof) 03n-08 6316 2843 CLLin@ntu.edu.sg

Planned Weekly Schedule

Week Topic Course ILO Readings/ Activities
1

The concept and regulation of homeostasis

3, 4, 5

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

2

Endocrine regulation of homeostasis (I)

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

3

Endocrine regulation of homeostasis (II)

1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

4

The mechanism and key determinants of sexual differentiation.

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

5

Reproduction and contraception

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

6

Cardiovascular physiology (I)

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Computer simulation of cardiovascular system

7

Cardiovascular physiology (II)

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Computer simulation of cardiovascular system

8

Respiration and its regulation in response to changes in arterial O2, CO2 and hydrogen ion.

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

9

Basic physiology of digestion

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

10

Clinical perspective of digestive physiology

3, 4, 5, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

11

Renal function and its regulation (I)

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

12

Renal function and its regulation (II)

3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

13

Revision of regulation of body function

4, 7

Team-based learning and presentation.
Class discussion

Appendix 1: Assessment Rubrics

Rubric for Tutorials: Participation and quiz (10%)

Class participation, multiple choice questions (MCQ) and polling of open-ended questions

Marks

0 to 3

4 - 6

7-8

9 to 10

Criteria

Lack of participation.

Demonstrate poor understanding of the concepts and principles. Provide correct answer to less than 30% of the MCQs

Moderate participation. Demonstrate fair to good understanding of the concepts and principles. Provide correct answer to 40-60% of the MCQs. Able to solve some of the open-ended questions.

Active participation in discussion. Demonstrate very good understanding of the concepts and principles. Provide correct answer to 60-80% of the MCQs. Able to solve most of the open-ended questions.

Demonstrate excellent understanding of the concepts and principles.

Able to solve almost all the open-ended questions.

Rubric for Examination: Structured Questions & Multiple Choice Questions (60%)

Rubric for final exam: Structured Questions 

The structured questions will assess your knowledge, your ability to integrate your knowledge, your critical thinking and analytical skills and your communication skills in writing. You should be able to apply the concepts and principles taught in the course to explain physiological or pathological phenomenon at the system, cellular and molecular levels.

Marks

0 to 2

3 to 4

5 to 6

7 to 8

9 to 10

Criteria

The question is not attempted or the answer is totally irrelevant

Answers are partial or show ambiguity in the understanding of concept and principle; Key points are not clear.

Answers are mostly accurate, but show some errors. Key points are included, but not well explained.

Answers are accurate and complete. Key points are stated and explained, but show minor errors

Answers are comprehensive, accurate and complete. Key ideas are clearly stated, explained, and well supported.

Appendix 2: Intended Affective Outcomes

As a result of this course, it is expected you will develop the following "big picture" attributes:

Appreciate the elegant design of the human body and how it works.

Value the importance of a healthy lifestyle.

Appreciate the ethical implications of scientific knowledge.

Pursue a career that requires the knowledge of physiology.